What is causation and how can it be proved in a medical malpractice cases in DC, Maryland, and Virginia

Proving causation in DC, MD & VA medical malpractice cases: what to know

 

You may remember hearing about a major lawsuit earlier this year, in which a New York surgeon was found guilty of engaging in a money-making scheme by tricking patients into agreeing to undergo surgeries that were either altogether unnecessary or more complicated than necessary. In many of these instances, the patients incurred health complications or even died as a result of the work of the doctor, Spyros Panos. 

 

In this case, it is overwhelmingly clear that Panos’ patients were entirely misled and that their injuries or deaths were fully due to Panos’ sinister decisions. For that reason, $140 million in awards were granted to a total of 250 patients of Dr. Panos. While we hope that every victim of medical malpractice can easily prove that their suffering occurred largely or entirely due to the actions of their doctor, not every case is as clear as this New York case. Proving causation is one of the most difficult and complex aspects of any medical malpractice case.

 

But why is this so difficult? The National Law Review says that a lot of this trickiness comes down to the fact that, unfortunately, it is your responsibility as the patient (with the help of your attorney, of course) to prove that a doctor or hospital treated you inadequately or incorrectly. And if that isn’t enough, you also must prove that this lack of sufficient care is what caused your injury or otherwise harmed you.

 

So what can you do to provide support to your claim that your doctor has caused you harm? Probably the most important thing that you can do as an individual is to document everything. You never know what might become useful evidence, and for that reason, you should track the entire process of your medical care, take note of anything strange you might experience, and make sure to get your medical records from your providers.

 

However, it goes without saying that many of the steps that must be taken to prove wrongdoing on the part of your doctor or hospital should be done by or with the help of a legal team and their expert witnesses and consultants. If you believe you are a victim of medical malpractice, or even just wonder if you might have a case on your hands, it is important to contact an attorney as soon as possible. A lawyer will be able to help you with the technical aspects of your case, deal with all the complexities of long-term lawsuits, and be your greatest advocate.

 

If you believe you might have a case or if you have any questions about medical malpractice in the D.C, area, reach out to us. We represent people and families who have faced tragic or life-changing outcomes due to medical negligence, and we fight to make sure they receive all the resources and care that they need. 

 

So reach out to us today at 202-393-3320. There’s no risk or obligation, and it's all confidential.  But remember, we focus our efforts on people who are critically, permanently injured, so because of that, we can't help everyone who calls.  But we can often give you some great (and free) materials that can help you. Just click here or on the image below to order your free information and get you better prepared to deal with your difficult situation.