Kids with cerebral palsy and physical challenges doing great things

 

The other day I read this article about a high school student from Ravenna, Ohio who surprised her mother at graduation by walking. You may be wondering -- what's the big deal about that? Well, she has cerebral palsy and she was told that she might not survive, let alone walk.

Her name is Lexi Wright. The story caught my eye because she Ravenna is about 20 minutes from where I grew up in small-town Ohio. You may have read the story too -- it was picked up by the Washington DC Express, the New York Post, Fox 8, the Associated Press, and maybe a dozen other smaller news outlets.

Isn't it nice to read some good news for a change?

According to NY Post, the nineteen-year-old high schooler got up out of her wheelchair and used a walker to cross the stage, defining her graduation experience by capability and not disability. She had wanted to surprise her mother, who of course sobbed through the standing ovation given her daughter. Lexi had been practicing for that moment all year long.

We love to help write positive narratives about challenging situations; it's the hallmark of why we do what we do. Children with cerebral palsy are very dear to our heart because they are up against so much, and in the case of our clients, they still achieve great things that would be difficult for anyone, let alone someone with profound physical challenges.

Like the girl with cerebral palsy, one of our former clients with significant physical challenges caused by medical malpractice at a DC hospital just graduated ..... get ready for it ..... with a bachelor's degree from George Mason University! For those of you who know the schools around here will recognize that George Mason is a really good school, and not an easy one. We were able to get a significant settlement for him and his mother, to help with his care and to help him achieve great things!

We will be interviewing this client for one of our upcoming newsletters -- stay tuned for his inspiring story!

Do you have a child or know a child who has been affected by significant developmental delays or cerebral palsy? Did the hospital in DC, Maryland or Virginia tell you that these challenges could have potentially been prevented? Sometimes these issues are caused by preventable birth trauma, and the hospital won't bring that to your attention.

 

 

Give us a call today at 202-393-3320 if you have questions about your child's cerebral palsy or developmental delays. You will speak to a real person who wants to hear your story.

Brooke Birkey

Manager Education, Marketing & Communications

Donahoe Kearney, LLP

[email protected]

                             202-393-3320