Teen Drivers and Accidents in the DMV


This morning I read an article in the Washington Post, talking about how teenagers are opening Tide Pods with their teeth, or "cooking" them in frying pans and subsequently chewing them up and spitting them out.  Why? They seem to be mimicking what they've seen on Youtube; where high-risk behavior can become a viral video with a hashtag that encourages you to do it yourself. These antics can be repeated by any kid looking for a thrill that comes with taking such an incredible risk or to get high by easy-to-access household products. Other similar challenges include the "bath salts challenge" and the "fire challenge"; not to mention the pharm parties that have been around for decades.

How the hell did we get into this mess?

We all know that teenagers lack impulse control (the pre-frontal cortext doesn't fully develop until early to mid twenties) but this is more than just questionable decision-making. This is downright flirting with death. These behaviors make me wonder, what kind of kids are we putting on the roads these days?

Ideally, a person who is granted a driver's license would have the emotional intelligence to be able to properly consider others on the road. While we all know that there is a certain risk with teenage driving in any case, have we tipped the scale to irresponsibility in granting sixteen year-olds licenses? Considering the decision-making records of American teens; wiling to seriously injure themselves in order to one-up their friends on a crazy social media challenge; should we reevaluate the legal driving age? Exhibiting a lack of concern for others is a big problem; but what is to be said about a complete lack of concern for self? As the teen practices of car-surfing and trunking, reflect, it is a very legitimate concern.

What do you think? Email us at [email protected] with your thoughts;

we will run them in our next newsletter.

At Donahoe Kearney we are extremely well-practiced in representing those who have been in a serious auto accident. Call us at 202-393-3320 for a no-risk, confidential, and free consultation. 

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