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Donahoe Kearney, LLP
Call (202) 393-3320
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Fax (202) 393-3324

Experienced D.C. medical malpractice lawyers explain how a case against a hospital changed a young man's life.

We just had lunch with a client and his family in a new home purchased with proceeds from a significant medical malpractice settlement.  Its a good example of how a medical malpractice case worked for this young person and his family.

Most medical malpractice cases for a significant injury or condition like paralysis, brain damage or death, are complex, expensive and take a lot of time.  It can be a time of stress for a patient and their family who are not only coping with the effects of the injury but are now fighting a hospital, HMO or healthcare corporation in court.  So all that effort has to help the patient - make a significant difference in his or her life.

Our client, a young man, is paralyzed from the waist down. He lived with his family who were a great help, but the housing wasn't adequate or accessible. He needed more room, not just for his wheelchair, but for his privacy as well, but wanted his family to be close.  He was also receiving social security disability benefits he wanted to protect.

The solution? His settlement proceeds, including both immediate cash and lifetime annuity payments, went into a special needs trust which immediately bought a home that he chose - one that is perfect for him and his family.  It has a great open and accessible floor plan and a walk out lower level with a separate entrance that is being built out to suit his needs, with a handicap accessible walkway, roll in shower, sitting area and elevator to the main level.

The settlement changed his life, and will continue to do so, by making resources available that he can use for the house, transportation, education and other things that will enrich his life.

By the way, the food was delicious as well.  Another benefit of having family (especially mom) living upstairs.