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Undiagnosed Sepsis and Septic Shock can be Medical Malpractice in Hospitals in DC, Maryland, and Virginia

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D.C. MEDICAL MALPRACTICE UPDATE

The consequences of sepsis and septic shock; caused by an undiagnosed infection, can be catastrophic and deadly. Not to mention completely preventable.

How Does Sepsis Happen in a D.C. Hospital?

Sepsis is an immune response to a bacterial infection in the blood stream. In common terms; it's a full-body infection that's difficult to stop once it starts. The damages can be as serious as loss of limbs, multi-organ failure, and death. Here is information the CDC has on sepsis. If someone you know is in the hospital with these signs and symptoms, take immediate action and talk to their medical care teams. It could mean the difference between life and death; or catastrophic loss of health.

We have represented a young boy who lost parts of all four limbs because the pediatrician, hospital doctors, and nurses did not recognize the signs and symptoms of his worsening infection before it was too late.  The hospital didn't have a system in place; they held him in a waiting room off of the ER because they thought he could be contagious. They failed to review all of his information; no one person looked at  his medical chart, lab results, and clinical exam. Neither did they have him seen by a specialist.

 Every health care provider who saw him just did their little piece without looking at the whole picture.  With no one to coordinate his care and put it all together, his sepsis, or septicemia, led to septic shock. Septic shock led to shutting down of his vital organs.

It could have been prevented by antibiotics, oxygen, and fluids had they started shortly after he got to the hospital.

In another medical malpractice case, a young mother lost parts of her limbs after going in to septic shock in a local hospital.  Again, there was an infection, a known source of infection, and lots of information available about her worsening condition.  The residents and interns seeing the patient in the hospital recorded all of the information and test results, but didn't have the experience to put it all together and take action.  A consultant in an unrelated specialty finally diagnosed sepsis and provided treatment that probably saved the patient's life; but not before catastrophic limb loss. 

Catastrophic injuries that occur during a hospitalization should always be investigated to determine whether they were preventable.  If you know someone we could help, please call us at (202) 393 - 3320.  Don't delay the help that you can get today.

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